Cocktails? Bring It!

Standard

As you can probably see from my writing these days, I have been way too busy. I’m working with a couple of clients on French wines (one with a hardcore boutique selection, one that involves powerhouse Bordeaux classics), prepping for a trip to Europe (watch out for another #2shotsaway story arc!), and cramming French (enough to survive the French countryside, merci O!).

The few times I get over my introversion and enjoy the company of like-minded (read: occasionally crazy) people are fabulous (and much-needed)… This is why I truly looked forward to the BYOB (bring your own bottle) cocktail party that my friends in a culinary school held a week ago.

Being in the company of young (-ish), progressive, no-bulls*** culinary geniuses (naks, V, you owe me one) inspired me to create a timely story arc for the holiday season: What drink do I bring to a party I’m invited to?

I also decided to deviate from the usual, clinical manner and talk about actual experiences.

Take this BYOB cocktail party I’m pertaining to. There were a few factors to consider:

  • I was going to be in the presence of awesome culinary people (seriously, V, you owe me one), so I couldn’t bring anything stupid
  • One of them has a predilection for French cuisine
  • They were only serving cocktail food (or as we Pinoys like to call it, pica-pica)
  • These people are known to think outside the box

These things taken into account, I decided to address each point this way:

  • Nothing stupid means I can’t go to the grocery for this one
  • Maybe I should pick a French wine
  • I shouldn’t do a red (a red would be too heavy for cocktail food), and I should pick a refreshing, dry white
  • I don’t need to go WAY over budget, nor do I have to bring a “powerhouse” wine from some exclusive château
sancerre edited

A Bottle of Crisp Sancerre

I went to Bacchus (because they have yet to disappoint me with their selection) and got a bottle of La Bourgeoise Sancerre 2008. It was almost past its peak (one more year would have turned that baby into vinegar), and was starting to reveal complex aromas and flavors beyond the usual acidic green fruits one would expect of a typical Sancerre. It was a blast figuring out the flavors with chefs, and it went wonderfully with the food (really complicated, extremely modern, and exquisitely delicious stuff).

Stay tuned for more topics like this, especially since the holidays are coming up.

Can’t figure out what to bring to an upcoming event? Let me know. Cheers!

About Gail Sotelo

For updates, follow 2shots on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/2shotsandapint For glorious drinkporn, follow us on Instagram: @2shotsandapintofficial Drunk posts, shout outs, and messages are welcome. ;)

One response »

  1. Pingback: Happy Accidents in the French Countryside | 2 Shots and a Pint

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s